The Confidence Kick

I’m currently reading The Confidence Code by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman, and it’s everything girls, women and parents need to know about understanding confidence!

The bottom line: It’s not enough to be talented. You have to be confident.tightrope_lowres

Recent studies have shown evidence that confidence is actually more important than competence when earning social status. In the work or school environment that might mean you’ll be more admired, listened to, and influential for being confident—even if you’re not the sharpest tool in the shed. The fact is that a lot of confident people are confident they can learn anything they need to know.

Confidence is important because it ignites action. It is optimism and self-assurance in yourself that you can do a thing, so you actually go and do it. The opinions of others do not stop you. Confidence allows some people to try sooner than others. It also allows those same people to fail many times but keep trying—because they know deep inside they can do it.

If confidence is the deciding factor in success, you can either “get better faster” or you can get better at using your voice a lot more and letting rejection and criticism slide of you more easily. Okay, not always easy, but put yourself out there! Learn to use your voice, speak up and speak often—in whatever form that takes. Don’t wait to submit a story, or art, or proposal. Just do it. There is no gain for you in holding back, so take a few more risks. It might even be a faster way to gain mastery and experience. And really, if the other half of the population has no trouble sounding a little ridiculous, why should you? One of your ideas will eventually hit.

BlueWall.001Today, give yourself a kick in the butt, and put on your confidence. Think about the things you do well and let that fill you up. Don’t let lack of experience hold you back from asking for a job, promotion, opportunity, or introduction. Raise your hand high in class—better yet, shout out an answer.

The fact is you likely have a lot more to offer than you realize.

Until next time,

Tricia